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November 19, 2012 at 1:00 PMComments: 2 Faves: 0

Tone of Schecter

By Dayton from SLN More Blogs by This Author

Every guitarist has his or her brand. Everyone has different tastes of how a guitar should look and feel. Some of the guitar community swear by their Tele Deluxe, saying it's the best thing since non-linear video editing. Others cling to the old school Rickenbacker hollow bodies and tout them as the grandfather of musical evolution. 

I'm in love with Schecter. That's right! I said it! Now before you start giving me crap about my choice of guitaring equipment, hear me out. The reason I love Schecter is that...I'm what you would describe as poor. I don't have the ability to wake up and say, "Hey, I think I'm gonna go grab an Ibanez Prestige today," and go off all willy nilly, throwing hundred dollar bills at the Ibanez man and telling him to show me the magic (which as weird and awkward as that sounds, that's exactly how I would buy an Ibanez Prestige). Since I have such a lack of funds for things as car insurance, much less a collection of multi-thousand dollar guitars, I've come to appreciate Schecter. The guitars they produce are very good quality for the price you'll pay.

Let me show you...

The Flagship

Schecter Hellraiser C-1

This is the model I own, and I absolutely love it! The Hellraiser has a 3 piece mahogany neck and a mahogany body. The fingerboard is made of rosewood and, though it doesn't have the attack of something like ebony, the combination of woods resonates well. 

The Good: The reason that I love mahogany so much is that it accentuates the bass and mid tones of your sound. This is especially prominent to me when you take out the bottom of the tone through your amp or pedal while running through the bridge pickup. It creates a sound that's very distinguishable through distortion without being ear-piercingly bright. The C-1 also features a set neck with 'ultra access'. The neck is designed to play like a neck thru, and, though the authentic neck-thrueyness is lacking, the sustain and feel of the set neck are fabulous. The 'ultra access' heel is basically just a more gradual transition from the neck to the body. Unlike a bolt-on, it allows for better playability on higher frets.

Then there's the price. It's listed on Schecter's site for $1,069, which is a freaking load of crap. Go to any Guitar Center, and you can find the hard tail model for $849, and sometimes $749 when it's on sale. If you don't mind playing a used instrument, these things sell on craigslist for around $400. Magic.

The Not So Good: The feel of this guitar is great. Whoever was in charge of the neck setup deserves a gold star. However, things change in the build quality when you look at the electronics...The active EMG pickups are pretty good but could be improved upon, unless you are looking for a very percussive, clean tone. A problem that seems to plague all Hellraisers and Omens is the stupid output that comes loose! AHH! It gets annoying to have to tighten it down every so often. The other problem I have with this guitar is that the volume knobs aren't secured very well; I had to re-glue them from the inside.

The Metal Head

Special Edition Black Jack SLS Avenger FR-S

I think I love this guitar because of it's super huge name! But it has quite a few more merits than that. Schecter's 'Avenger' style guitars are my favorite! They're super modern and angry looking, and Schecter makes some really cool models with that shape. 

The Good: The neck on the Black Jack Avengers are 3 piece maple with an ebony fingerboard. I'm a huge fan of ebony because it has a very snappy sound to it, which is great for metal playing. The body shape is AWESOME, and the pickups that come pre-installed are amazing. The sustainiac pickup will give you unlimited sustain, and the Seymour Duncan Full Shred gives great metal tones. Another great feature is the harmonic mode, it gives the guitar an edgier, dual-personality sound. Watch this...

The Not So Good: The Black Jack is a great guitar and is versatile in it's own right. The only issue I can see, as far as tonality goes, is that you'll never get deep melodic tones. Not to say that it's tinny or shrill, but the sustainiac driver mixed with the Full Shred's seems to deliver a modestly squeaky, clean middle tone . I'm not a huge fan of the head stock either.  All that being said, I would love to own this guitar...so...much...

The Retro

Schecter Corsair Bigsby

But have you ever said, 'Hey! I really want a Gibson ES335 and stuff!?" Then, welcome to the club, I'm pretty sure everyone on the planet ever has yearned for such a legendary guitar. Unfortunately, not all of us don't have the coin to drop on a Gibby at the moment. Insert Schecter's Corsair!

The Good: It looks the part very well! These are gorgeous guitars. What I love most about these guitars is the sound  they make. It isn't trying to pillage villages or declare war on Russia, instead it just tries to calm you down and give you a hug. The sound is light and classic, but, ye be warned, the SH-1 pickups sound like crap coming out of a solid state amp. For this guitar, having a low quality amp is not an option.

The Bad: The feel of this guitar is a bit off to me, but that's consistent with a lot of hollow body electrics. They're so light but so BIG! I really enjoy the sound through some tubes and the fact that I can hear myself play when I'm unplugged, but the overall feel of this guitar alienates me a little. The neck suffers from the same problem a low end Gibson does, the string feel being stiff and uncooperative on the frets. Also, being an arch top, the action is higher than I like. The Bigsby Bar is really cool looking and functional for little things, but I feel like I'm going to break it when I really ream on it. 

Thanks for reading! 

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2 Comments

  • If I didn't know any better, I would say this blog was wee-bit biased.

  • Pshhhhh...this guy.....psh....I have not a single idea of what he means

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