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June 25, 2012 at 8:00 AMComments: 2 Faves: 0

UPDATE! Pets and their age not what you think it is!

By Victoria Swanson More Blogs by This AuthorFrom the Paws & Awws Blog Series

I recently wrote a blog about calculating the age of our pets. Well, the old version is out and the new version is in due to recent data and studies. In my last blog I touched base on both dogs and cats. In this blog, I will be discussing only cats: Indoor Cats vs. Outdoor Cats.

Under the Cats information in my last blog, I included both old age calculation vs. new age calculation and it looked like this.

Cat's Age

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

OLD AGE CALCULATION

0

7

14

21

28

35

42

49

56

63

70

77

84

91

98

105

112

119

NEW Age in Human Years

0

15

24

28

32

36

40

44

48

52

56

60

64

68

72

76

80

84

According to this formula above, after age two, you add four years to every year after that, for the cat. The formula I found only pertained to indoor cats. I recently received an updated version of indoor cat vs. outdoor cat age expectancy. Take a look at this!

The outdoor cat calculation is adding an additional four years to each year. ;

With this new information it would look like this on the grid below:

Cat's Age

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

Indoor Cat – Human Years

0

15

24

28

32

36

40

44

48

52

56

60

64

68

72

Out Door Cat - Human Years

0

15

24

32

40

48

56

64

70

80

88

96

104

112

120

My last outdoor (and indoor) cat (Cody) lived to be 17 years old in human years, according to this formula (using the outdoor portion), he was 144 years old! That is one old cat!

The reasoning behind this new calculation, splitting the age difference between an indoor and outdoor cat, is because an outdoor cat's life is considered to be more dangerous. The average life expectancy of an outdoor cat is 10 years old (56 in human years).

My two current cats (Oliver and Casey), both outdoor cats (they do come inside our house on a regular basis), are 11 and 12 years old (96 and 104 years old in human years). They have surpassed the statistic of only living for 10 years for being an outdoor cat. I am thrilled and they are both still going strong.

I believe an outdoor cat's age statistics should also be based on their environment and how well they are taken care of. Casey and Oliver are on the best diet (with supplements), come inside our home on a regular basis (they are considered an indoor and outdoor cat), their vaccinations are always up to date and both are neutered. I feel this gives them an advantage in terms of longevity and being outdoor cats.

I have also seen many indoor cats, in poor condition that don't live pass 7 years old.

What do you think of this new formula dealing with the age of indoor and outdoor cats?

Do you feel a cat's living environment plays a role in age?

Resources:

Animal Discovery - Life Stages

Yahoo - Old Pet Correctly Calculate Dog / Cats Age

Catster - Calculate Cat Age in Cat Years

More from Health Coach Victoria Swanson Others Are Reading

2 Comments

  • I'm not agree with this calculation. Our friend lived in a village (Russian) and his 20 years old female cat was a very popular bride and had kittens! She was hunting in the forest, fishing in the river and went anywhere she wanted without control. In my opinion the life span of the cat depends on quality of food (not commercial) - fresh caught game, fresh air, calm environment (not in the city), lot of excercise and freedom. And of course, the pure breed would live much shorter life than a home-half-stray, because it is a natural selection (the strongest will survive) and is not artificially created people's toy. In Canada I new people whoes cats lived 22, 27 and 28 years - all are farm cats. So, according to these tables, how old are they suppose to be? Cheers. Natalia.

  • Hi Natalia - Unfortunately these tables don't reflect that. But, I agree with you - the more natural a habitat and environment can be - the better and healthier it is for all animals.

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