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February 4 at 8:00 AMComments: 0 Faves: 0

Things Nurses Should Know about Kratom

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Its an unscheduled opioid receptor agonist, even though banned by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), It is widely available and not very costly. You may see storefront signs touting kratom products in your community with claims to take care of pain, cure opioid addiction, or manage opioid withdrawal.

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As well as the actions associated with the substance itself, a big concern is that "Using products with unsubstantiated claims may prevent those hooked on opioids from seeking treatments that have been demonstrated to be effective and safe" (FDA, 2019). As nurses, we must remain educated, share our knowledge, and start to become alert for usage of kratom and other products with unsupported claims and significant health risks.

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Here's what you ought to know

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1. Kratom (Mitragyna speciose) is a tropical tree indigenous to Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and New Guinea.

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2. There aren't any FDA-approved uses for kratom.

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3. Kraken Kratom is generally marketed as a dietary supplement.

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4. The forms of kratom include leaves, pills, capsules, powder and tea.

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5. Other names for kratom include Mitragyna speciosa, mitragynine extract, biak-biak, cratom, gratom, ithang, kakuam, katawn, kedemba, ketum, krathom, krton, mambog, madat, Maeng da leaf, nauclea, Nauclea speciosa or thang.

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6. Small doses of Kraken kratom produce stimulatory effects like cocaine or amphetamines.

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7. Large doses of kratom are associated with sedative-narcotic effects just like opioids.

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8. Repeated use of kratom can cause hypertension, renal toxicity, impaired cognitive function and behavior, and liver injury.

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9. Withdrawal medical indications include tremor, anorexia, weight loss, decreased libido, insomnia, muscle spasms and pain, fever, diarrhea, and psychosis.

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10. Kratom can be included with other products without identification into the labeling.

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11. Having less regulatory controls, production standardization, and sale of products contaminated with potentially toxic and infectious substances donate to the chance associated with this system.

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It's important for us to educate patients that "legal" and "available" do not imply safety. Claims that kratom is a natural replacement for opioids are unproven. Share these facts, keep pace regarding the latest evidence, and report any adverse reactions to the FDA MedWatch program.

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