Share
You could earn SmartPoints on this page!SmartPoint Coin

February 6, 2013 at 8:00 AMComments: 3 Faves: 0

The Ragdoll

By Erin Froehlich More Blogs by This Author

Ragdoll Stats

************************************************************************************************************

Cat of the Week: The Ragdoll

************************************************************************************

Ragdoll Cats

Ragdoll Cats

************************************************************************************************************

Fun Facts About Ragdoll Cats

************************************************************************************

  • Ragdolls are one of the largest breeds out there with some healthy males reaching 35lbs!
  • Compared with many of the cats we know today, the Ragdoll is relatively new breed. Though not quite as young as last week’s Feline 101 star, the American Curl which first appeared in the 1980’s, the Ragdoll traits were not developed until 1960’s and were not recognized by cat fanciers until 1993.
  • The origins of the breed’s defining characteristics are the subject of some debate and controversy. While it’s agreed that the line owes its roots to Josephine, a non-pedigree white domestic longhair cat (some say a feral white Angora), and her kittens, a solid black male, a seal-pointed bicolor female, a seal-point female, and black and white mitted male, owner Ann Baker’s assertion that Josephine bred with a feral black and white mitted (white-pawed) longhair and subsequently, with a solid brown longhair cannot actually be substantiated.
  • To add to the confusion, to this day Ms. Baker claims the Ragdoll’s tendency to go limp when handled is the result of government interference and genetic testing which she believes occurred after Josephine was hit by a car. She also asserts that this genetic modification made Ragdolls impervious to pain – a myth propagated and accepted as fact for some time that also happens to be entirely false.
  • Ann Baker certainly had some grand plans for the Ragdoll breed. She created her own registry for the breed which she called the International Ragdoll Cat Association (IRCA) and even went so far as to franchise and trademark the Ragdoll name – moves that likely held the breed back from true international acceptance. However, with IRCA standards becoming increasingly strict, and a desire for recognition in the CFA (Cat Fanciers Association), many proponents of the breed have since left that organization.
  • In 1993, non IRCA owners finally got what they were seeking. The CFA began accepting Ragdoll cats in their “Miscellaneous” class meaning they can now be registered and exhibited at the big cat shows, though they are unfortunately ineligible for Championship titles. However, since trademarks on the name Ragdoll expired in 2005and have not been renewed since, there is hope the CFA will someday recognize Ragdolls in the longhair breed class making a Grand Champion Ragdoll possible.
  • Contrary to all the animosity and craziness surrounding their development, Ragdoll cats are renowned for their sweet, tolerant nature.

Ragdoll Cats

Ragdoll Kitten

************************************************************************************************************

Fun Facts About Ragdoll Cats

************************************************************************************

Large Size. As mentioned earlier, the Ragdoll is one of the largest cat breeds around. Average females range from a substantial 10lbs to a hefty 15. Average males range from 15 to 25lbs. If you’re looking at little cat, it’s probably not a Ragdoll.

Long, Soft Fur. Ragdolls come in solid, colorpoint,(The colorpoint trait originating from the Siamese is actually a form of albinism. You can read more about that in Feline 101’s Siamese article.) particolor mitted, and particolor bicolor patterns. Traditional pointed Ragdolls come in seal, chocolate, blue, and lilac with some judges also accepting van, red, and cream as well. However, regardless of your Ragdoll’s pattern or shade, you can bet their semi-long coat will be an extremely soft. Many experts compare Ragdoll fur to the feel of a rabbit’s.  

Bright Blue Eyes. While their fur can vary widely, breed regulations are quite strict when it comes to the Ragdoll’s eyes. They should be large, oval, moderately wide set and bright blue. Crossed eyes aren’t ideal, but are fairly common to the breed. Owners of solid white Ragdolls should be aware that cats that have white hair and blue eyes, or even just one blue eye and one of another color, are ay an increased risk of deafness on the side of the blue eye. This isn’t to say a deaf cat can’t be a good cat – they can be and are! You’ll just need to make a few accommodations for them.

Ragdoll Cats

Ragdoll Cats

************************************************************************************************************

What To Expect from a Ragdoll

************************************************************************************

Extreme Tolerance. While the Ragdoll is a beautiful cat without a doubt, their key defining feature and the one most people say they love the breed for is their extreme tolerance while being handled. These are extremely friendly cats, so happy for the human contact many go absolutely limp at touch - just like the rag dolls for which they were named!

Just check out this floppy Ragdoll kitten here:

The Ragdoll’s laid-back nature makes them a great choice for families with other pets or young children. While children should definitely be taught to treat the Ragdoll gently as you would with any other cat, owners tell stories of finding these cats dressed in baby doll clothing or being walked around on a leash. Try that on another breed, and you’re likely to get a smack!

A Puppy-Like Cat.  Cat experts describe the Ragdoll as a puppy-like cat. They just want to be wherever their favorite people are and they’ll follow you from room to room like loyal little puppies to be there.

A Couch Potato. While the Ragdoll is an intelligent cat that will appreciate games of fetch with a tin foil ball or a little laser chase action, they’re not known for their abundance of energy. In fact, some would call them lazy. They see little reason to jump up on that perch or to run from your rambunctious Terrier. Why exert unnecessary energy? They’re perfectly happy lounging around looking beautiful and taking in adoration by your side.

A Lover Kitty. Good with children and other pets and they want nothing more than to be with you. You’ve got a constant, loving companion with the Ragdoll.

Floppy Cats

Ragdoll Cat

************************************************************************************************************

More Ragdolls!!

************************************************************************************

Ragdoll Kitten

Ragdoll Kittens

Ragdoll Cat

Ragdoll Kittens

SOURCES

VetStreet: The Ragdoll

Animal Planet: Cat Breed Directory: The Ragdoll

The Cat Fancier’s Association: Ragdoll Breed Profile

Animal Planet: Cats 101: The Ragdoll

YouTube: Why They're Called Ragdolls - Posted by Zelkova Ragdolls

Helgren, J. Anne (2006). Ragdoll. Telemark Productions

U.S. trademark number 1,026,916

PHOTO CREDITS

Andreas Solberg@flickr

Martijn Nijenhuis@flickr

Wabisabi2015@flickr

DirtBikeDBA (Mike)@flickr

roxeteer@flickr

Pacificat Ragdolls@flickr

More from Erin Froehlich Others Are Reading

3 Comments

  • "A puppy-like cat" - HA! No wonder I love them so much! ;)

    My boyfriend's family has a ragdoll kitty, and she is seriously the sweetest, nicest cat I've ever known. I had no idea their development was so crazy (government conspiracies?? O.O) but they sure are wonderful cats!

  • Yeah, Ann Bower sounds like a crazy cat lady if I ever heard of one, but she sure made some pretty kitties. :)

  • Oh, cutest kitty ever! To bad I'm allergic to cats!

Comment on the Smart Living Network


Site Feedback